study in New Zealand

New Zealand

8

Universities

200+

Courses

About

Students aspiring to study abroad often find it hard to select the country and the university matching their interests and budget. However, if a student is willing to experience quality education with affordable tuition fees, then New Zealand is a fast emerging and an ideal study destination for them. Besides, New Zealand is one of the safest countries in the world – ranked second in the Global Peace Index for 2018 and growing enormously in terms of research and development. Moreover, The New Zealand Education system is progressive as well as much cheaper with state of art facilities. New Zealand universities and their qualifications are highly recognized and regarded by employers across the globe.

As a country, New Zealand is known for its beautiful scenic beauty and adventure sports. The country comprises two main islands—the North and South Islands—and a number of small islands, some of them hundreds of miles from the main group. The capital of New Zealand is Wellington and the largest urban area is Auckland; both are located on the North Island. Moreover, Auckland is considered one of the world’s most liveable cities, ranking third in the 2019 Quality of Living survey conducted annually by the global HR consultants Mercer. English, Māori, and New Zealand Sign Language are the official languages, with English being predominant.

Thereby, due to its low cost of living and exclusive facilities, a large number of international students choose to study in New Zealand every year.

Why study in New Zealand?

  • Global recognized universities
  • Excellent quality of education
  • Top-notch campuses
  • Globally recognized courses
  • Post-study work opportunities
  • Safe and friendly country
  • Politically stable
  • Student-friendly campuses

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Top Universities in New Zealand

  • 1University of Auckland
  • 2University of Canterbury
  • 3University of Otago
  • 4Auckland University of Technology
  • 5Victoria University of Wellington
  • 6The University of Waikato
  • 7Massey University
  • 8Lincoln University Canterbury

Top Courses in New Zealand

  • 1Hospitality and Tourism
  • 2Business studies
  • 3IT and Computer science
  • 4Cyber Security
  • 5Agriculture
  • 6Medicine
  • 7Animation
  • 8Arts and Humanities

Industry and Economic Outlook

Established

New Zealand has the world's 53rd-largest national economy by nominal GDP and experiencing promising economic growth across a number of industries. Hospitality & Tourism are an essential part of the GDP and amongst freshers, the employment level has been stable at around 90%.

In Demand Job Sectors

The emerging sectors in New Zealand are as follows

  • Healthcare
  • Information and Communication Technology(ICT)
  • Biotechnology
  • Food and Beverage

Skill Shortages

The Long Term Skill Shortage List

  • Civil engineering technician
  • Electrical engineering technician
  • Procurement management

The regional skill shortage list

  • Agriculture and forestry
  • Construction Industry
  • Structural engineer
  • Building associate

Quick facts

life

Avg Living costs / per year

$15,000 - $20,000

life

Avg Tuition Fee/Year

Undergraduate programs-$22,000 - $32,000
Postgraduate programs:$26,000-$37,000

life

Indian students

20,000+

life

International students

117,000

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Avg graduate
incomes / Year

$40,000 - $50,000

life

Migration possibility

YES

life

Intakes

Major intake in February and July
Rolling intakes for some of the courses

life

Scholarships Available

YES

Global Ed Process

New Zealand FAQ

Students aspiring to study abroad often find it hard to select the country and the university matching their interests and budget. However, if a student is willing to experience quality education with affordable tuition fees, then New Zealand is a fast emerging and an ideal study destination for them. Also, New Zealand is growing enormously in terms of research and development.As a country, New Zealand is known for its beautiful scenic beauty and adventure sports. The country comprises two main islands—the North and South Islands—and a number of small islands, some of them hundreds of miles from the main group. The capital of New Zealand is Wellington and the largest urban area is Auckland; both are located on the North Island. Auckland is considered one of the world’s most liveable cities, ranking third in the 2019 Quality of Living survey conducted annually by the global HR consultants Mercer. It’s held that slot since 2012. English, Māori, and New Zealand Sign Language are the official languages, with English being predominant. Moreover, New Zealand is listed amongst one of the safest, easy-going and welcoming countries in the world with diverse cultures. The friendly and open culture of New Zealand is one of the major reasons in terms of ease in adaptation/ change of lifestyle for international students. New Zealand is one of the safest countries in the world – ranked second in the Global Peace Index for 2018. The New Zealand Education system is progressive as well as much cheaper with many states of art facilities. New Zealand universities and their qualifications are highly recognized and regarded by employers across the globe. Also, some of the famous discoveries of New Zealand are Bungy Daredevil, Aquada Speedster, Atomic Whizz, The Jetboat, Jogging Maestro, Zorbing, The Hobbiton to name a few. Due to its low cost of living and exclusive facilities, a large number of international students choose to study in New Zealand every year.Hospitality & Tourism are an essential part of the GDP and amongst freshers, the employment level has been stable at around 90%. Also, an international student can enjoy the post-study work permit for up to 3 years depending on their level of qualification in New Zealand. Major Cities in New Zealand: Some of the major cities in New Zealand are:
  • Wellington
  • Auckland
  • Christchurch
  • Hamilton
  • Wellington is the capital of New Zealand and wedged between steep hills and the sea. Museums, galleries, heritage buildings, and entertainment make it a great place to visit.
  • Auckland is the largest city of New Zealand situated between two harbors and dotted with extinct volcanoes.
  • Christchurch is located in New Zealand's Canterbury region on its South Island and is known as the Garden City because of its parks and gardens.
  • Hamilton is nestled on the banks of the mighty Waikato River and is known for its walks, gardens, cafes, and nightlife.
Demographic Profile of New Zealand New Zealand is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean, southeast of Australia whose current population has been estimated at just over 4.8 million(as per 2020). The birth rate and death rate of New Zealand are estimated at 13.1 births per 1000 population and 7.6 deaths per 1000 population respectively. Moreover, 20% of the population is in the age group of 0 to 14, 13% of the population is in the age group of 15 to 24 and the majority of the population approx. 40% is in the age group of 25 to 54. In terms of GDP, the economy in New Zealand is the 53rd strongest in the world, much of which is dependent upon their foreign trade with countries like Australia, all of the European Union, the United States, China, South Korea, Canada, and Japan. Remaining 12 % population falls in the age group of 55 to 64 and 15% forms the elderly group aged 66 and above. Also, the average life expectancy calculated for New Zealand is 81 years of age. In terms of ethnicity, a significant number of New Zealand's population is of European descent (70 percent), with the indigenous Māori being the largest minority (16.5 percent), followed by Asians (15.3 percent), and non-Māori Pacific Islanders (9.0 percent). The religions among the residents of New Zealand come in at Christian 44.3% (including Catholic 11.6%, Anglican 10.8%, Presbyterian and Congregational 7.8%, Methodist, 2.4%, Pentecostal 1.8%, other 9.9%), Hindu 2.1%, Buddhist 1.4%, Maori Christian 1.3%, Islam 1.1%, other religion 1.4% (includes Judaism, Spiritualism, and New Age religions, Baha'i, Asian religions other than Buddhism), no religion 38.5%, not stated or unidentified 8.2%, and those objected answering came in at 4.1%. Culture in New Zealand The culture of New Zealand is essentially a Western culture influenced by the unique environment and geographic isolation of the islands, and the cultural input of the indigenous Māori people and the various waves of multi-ethnic migration which followed the British colonization of New Zealand. English is the predominant language spoken in New Zealand. Apart from English, Maori and New Zealand Sign Language also have official status. Cost of Living in New Zealand If the student is studying for more than one year in New Zealand, the student should have at least $15,000 to support for the first year. If the student is studying for less than a year, then the student must have at least $1250 for each month of study to contribute to his/her living expenses. In general, living costs also vary depending on the lifestyle and which part of the country the student lives in. For example, if a student is traveling frequently, then the cost of living tends to rise. Some costs vary by region as well. Accommodation costs vary widely by region: the national median weekly rent for a three to a four-bedroom house in October 2016 was $440, or $510 in Auckland. Employment opportunities in New Zealand Part-time Job opportunities: New Zealand student visas usually allow full-time students to work up to 20 hours a week during the academic year and up to 40 hours a week during the summer break. This applies to both secondary school and tertiary students. Research master's and Ph.D. students can work 40 hours a week all year round. Post-study employment opportunities: Each course has a level assigned to it by the New Zealand Government which helps to define the application criteria for post-study work visas. The NZQF is divided into 10 levels and covers a range of qualifications from certificates to doctoral degrees. Overall, in New Zealand, the Post-study work visa lasts for 1, 2 or 3 years depending on the level of your qualification and where you studied. For example, if a student has completed a Level 7 Bachelor’s degree in Auckland, then the student can apply for a post-study work visa for 3 years. However if a student has completed a graduate diploma or another Level 7 qualification outside Auckland,
  • on or before 31 December 2021, then the student can apply for a Post-study work visa for 2 years
  • after 31 December 2021, then the student can apply for a Post-study work visa for 1 year. Occupational Registration in New Zealand
  • Occupational registration is a legal requirement in New Zealand for certain occupations.
  • Full or provisional registration by a New Zealand organization authorized by law to give occupational registration may also mean your qualification is recognized.
  • Moreover, if you are directly interacting with people then occupational registration is a must.
Some of the professions in New Zealand along with their registration authority is mentioned below:                           
Occupation Registration Authority
Clinical PsychologistsNZ Psychologists Board
DentistDental Council of New Zealand
PhysiotherapistThe Physiotherapy Board of New Zealand
TeacherEducation Council New Zealand
Medical PractitionerMedical Council of New Zealand

Total International Student Population in New Zealand The top destinations for international students are Wellington, Auckland, Dunedin, Christchurch, and New Plymouth.The international student numbers at universities in New Zealand is steadily increasing from year to year. The number of international students currently studying in New Zealand is over 60,000 amongst which around 16,500 students are Indian(2018 est.)
New Zealand is one of the popular study abroad destinations with outstanding study opportunities and world-class quality education. The popular courses/streams of choice for international students are Arts and Humanities, Engineering, Design, Business and Commerce, Hospitality, Visual and Performing Arts, and Computer and Information Science. Each course has a level assigned to it by the New Zealand Government which helps to define the application criteria for post-study work visas. The NZQF is divided into 10 levels and covers a range of qualifications from certificates to doctoral degrees delivered through universities, institutes of technology, polytechnics, and private training establishments. Many institutions also offer English language courses.
  • New Zealand is known for its reputed universities, quality of education, high quality of life, diverse communities, vibrant cities, stunning natural scenery and an unbeatable range of outdoor pursuits. There are eight universities in New Zealand, all of which feature in the QS World University Rankings® 2019
  • University of Auckland: The University of Auckland is New Zealand’s largest and highest-ranked university.Its located in New Zealand’s largest city namely Auckland, which also acts as an urban center for New Zealand. Currently, it ranks 85th in the world, according to the QS World University Rankings 2019. Moreover, the university is made up of eight faculties and six campuses and currently has more than 40,000 students.
  • University of Canterbury: The University of Canterbury in New Zealand's second-oldest university after the University of Otago and located on the South Island, in the largest city of Christchurch. The university now operates its main campus in the Christchurch suburb of Ilam and offers degrees in Arts, Commerce, Education (physical education), Engineering, Fine Arts, Forestry, Health Sciences, Law, Music, Social Work, Speech and Language Pathology, Science, Sports Coaching and Teaching
  • University of Otago: the University of Otago is the oldest higher education institution in New Zealand and was established in 1869. It is New Zealand’s second entry in the QS World University Rankings 2019, ranked joint 175th in the world. The University of Otago is a collegiate university based in Dunedin, which is the second-largest city on the South Island of New Zealand.
  • Victoria University of Wellington: New Zealand’s third entrant in the QS World University Rankings 2019, Victoria University of Wellington is ranked joint 221st globally. It was established in 1897 as a constituent college of the University of New Zealand and became an independent institution in 1961. The university is well known for its programs in law, the humanities, and some scientific disciplines, and offers a broad range of other courses as well.
  • The University of Waikato: The University of Waikato ranks 266th in the world according to the QS World University Rankings 2020. It’s one of the younger top universities in New Zealand, founded in 1964, and is located in the cities of Hamilton and Tauranga on the North Island. The University of Waikato is known for its excellence in education and research. The university offers numerous study options across its eleven faculties and schools.
  • Massey University: Massey University is a university-based in Palmerston North, New Zealand, with significant campuses in Albany and Wellington. Massey University is the only university in New Zealand offering degrees in aviation, dispute resolution, veterinary medicine, and nanoscience.
  • Lincoln University Canterbury: Lincoln University is one of the leading higher education institutions in New Zealand, specializing in land use and management. It remains the smallest university in New Zealand and one of the 8 government universities
  • Auckland University of Technology: Auckland University of Technology was founded on 1 January 2000 when a former technical college was granted university status. The university has three campuses, with City campus being the largest in central Auckland. The two other campuses, South and North, are accessible via a shuttle bus.AUT is ranked as the best university in New Zealand for global research impact and is also one of the top 60 young universities worldwide. The AUT Business School has been recognized as one of the top business schools in the world by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International.
  • Scholarships for International students in New Zeland

    New Zealand offers a number of government-funded scholarships both for undergraduate and postgraduate study. Few of the New Zealand scholarships are listed here:

    • New Zealand International Doctoral Research Scholarships
    • CCSE Graduate Scholarship New Zealand ASEAN Scholar Awards
    • New Zealand Pacific Scholarships
    • BrokerFish International student scholarship.
    • NCEA scholarship(New Zealand Excellence Awards)-It is the scholarship offered for Indian students jointly by ENZ and 8 NZ universities.
    • University scholarships are available for specific courses, countries, etc, some of which are based on a first-come-first-served basis. Connect with our relationship teams as they have the expertise to map you to the best institution based on your profile and interests.
  • New Zealand follows a three-tier model of education which includes Early childhood education followed by primary and secondary schools (high schools) and finally tertiary education at universities and polytechnics. Early childhood education is between the age of two to six which is desirable however, not compulsory. However, 90% of people in New Zealand prefer to send their kids to the Kindergartens.
  • Overall, schooling is compulsory between 6-16 years of age. In addition, the child's education is free between the ages of 5 and 19 at state schools (schools that are government-owned and funded) if they're a New Zealand citizen or a permanent resident.
  • The New Zealand school education system is made up of thirteen-year levels. Any child's primary education starts at Year 1 and goes to Year 8 (around 5-12 years of age) followed by secondary education which goes from Year 9 to Year 13 (around 13-17 years of age).
  • Post this, students can either give a supplementary scholarship exam which allows them to study in certain Polytechnics and Private Tertiary Institutes or can pursue a bachelor’s degree directly by applying to universities and colleges.
  • Tertiary Education and Vocational Training: Tertiary education mostly includes all education after secondary school, so it comprises both higher education and vocational training. Tertiary education encompasses a wide range of education options. Education providers are present in each of the main centres and many satellite campuses in smaller areas. There is also flexibility in terms of distance learning to meet the adult learning needs.
  • New Zealand has 8 state-funded universities, 18 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) and about 550 Private Training Establishments (PTEs), which include English language schools
  • Universities are mostly known for offering higher degree-level education. The programs are research-led and generally academic rather than vocational. In the 2020 QS World University Rankings, seven of New Zealand’s universities were in the top 100 in at least one subject.
  • ITPs and a few larger PTEs offer vocational degree-level education. Vocational training is training programs for a particular trade or type of job and can be done while a student is working, often as part of an apprenticeship. Vocational training is also available at many secondary schools, alongside core academic subjects.
  • PTEs tend to offer specific vocational programs, mainly at certificate and diploma level.
  • The climate of New Zealand
    New Zealand, as a country is known for its beautiful scenic beauty and adventure sports. New Zealand comprises two main islands—the North and South Islands—and a number of small islands, some of them hundreds of miles from the main group. New Zealand mostly has a largely temperate climate. The far north of the country has an average temperature of about 15°C, while the deep south has a cooler average temperature of 9°C. January and February are the warmest months of the year, and July is the coldest month. In addition, New Zealand does not have a large temperature range, lacking the extremes one finds in most continental climates. However, the weather can change unexpectedly – as cold fronts or tropical cyclones quickly blow in. So the people living here are always prepared for sudden changes in weather and temperature more likely when they are going hiking or doing other outdoor activities. On one hand, Most areas of New Zealand have between 600 and 1600 mm of rainfall, spread throughout the year with a dry period during the summer. On the other hand, most places in New Zealand receive over 2,000 hours of sunshine a year, with the sunniest areas - Bay of Plenty, Hawke's Bay and Nelson/Marlborough - receiving over 2,350 hours. In addition, winter temperatures are much milder in New Zealand compared to other areas of similar latitude, with the exception of the Central Otago and Mackenzie Basin regions

  • The Political Environment of New Zealand
    New Zealand is a unitary parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy with consistent economic growth. Queen Elizabeth II is New Zealand's sovereign and head of state since 6 February 1952. The present Government comprises a three-party coalition between the Labour Party, New Zealand First, and the Green Party led by Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern who is also the Prime Minister of New Zealand. The opposition is the center-right New Zealand National Party led by Simon Bridges. Moreover, the judicial system is founded on English common law principles and is independent of the legislature. New Zealand was ranked the world's third most stable country in the Fund for Peace 2016 Fragile States Index. In fact, New Zealand was the first country in the world to grant women the unconditional right to vote (1893). The two main segments of law in New Zealand that specifically promote and protect human rights is the Human Rights Act 1993, and the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. A representative Parliament keeps public engagement with the political process high. Around 75-80% of New Zealanders vote in general elections. Keywords
  • The economic outlook of New Zealand
    The economy of New Zealand is known to be stable for a consistent period of time. The New Zealand GDP is projected to trend around 225.00 USD Billion in 2021 and 230.00 USD Billion in 2022. Recently, the population of New Zealand has been estimated at just over 4.8 million. In terms of GDP, the economy in New Zealand is the 53rd strongest in the world, much of which is dependent upon their foreign trade with countries like Australia, all of the European Union, the United States, China, South Korea, Canada, and Japan. According to the IMF, the government balance closed at 0% of GDP in 2019 and is expected to remain at similar levels in 2020 (-0.1%) and 2021 (0.4%). Based on the latest data, the unemployment rate of New Zealand is estimated at around 4.3% and expected to show a similar trend in 2020 and 2021 respectively. New Zealand's economy is majorly based on agricultural products and services such as tourism, retail, and wholesale trade. The quality of soil and excellent growing conditions coupled with advanced agricultural technology provide the ideal environment for pastoral, forestry and horticulture activities. New Zealand is also rich in natural resources, and it has deposits of iron ore, silver, coal, gold, and limestone. It is interesting to note that New Zealand ranks 22nd globally in iron ore production and 29th in gold production. The New Zealand electricity grid has a notable feature in the form of direct-current submarine cables across the Cook Strait. Those link the two main islands, enabling surplus hydroelectric power in the South to be used by the North’s concentration of industry and people. In addition, the government also sponsors various business networks and public support mechanisms that can help to get started.
  • The technological landscape of New Zealand
    New Zealand’s information and communications technologies (ICT) sector is diverse, covering wireless infrastructure, health IT, digital content, payments, geospatial, telecommunications, agricultural technology and more. Several global industries like the global IT services provider Fujitsu have chosen New Zealand as a base for their ICT operations.

    Emerging Sectors of New Zealand
    New Zealand has the world's 53rd-largest national economy by nominal GDP and experiencing promising economic growth across a number of industries. The primary sectors of New Zealand are agricultural-based with Petroleum and Minerals also amongst the biggest by market capitalization. Moreover, the agricultural sector is the largest industry in New Zealand Pastoral farming and horticulture make up most of the agricultural sector. Beef cattle rearing is practiced in Northland while dairy farming is the main activity in the wetlands of Taranaki, Northland, Southland, Manawatu, and Waikato areas. In fact, New Zealand produces 2.2% of the global milk output ranking it the 8th among the world’s largest milk producers.

    In terms of technology and Information Communications, New Zealand is one of the fastest-growing sectors as its impact is extensive and exhaustive in nature. Research and Development expenditure is substantial with high tech companies spending an average of 8% of their revenues on R & D Projects. According to IBIS World, online retail, IT security, and sports administration are among some of the growth industries tipped to boom over the next five years. New Zealand is also known for its Hospitality and Tourism industries. The tourism and hospitality sector is big business in New Zealand and currently the second-largest export earner, providing nearly 17.1% of total export revenues. Overall, the emerging industries that can be found in New Zealand are biotechnology, food and beverage, creative industries, information and communication technology, manufacturing, wood building and interiors, education and consultancy services, tourism, healthcare, and sustainability.

  • Skill Shortages in New Zealand
    New Zealand's Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment recognize areas where demand for skilled occupations is more than the supply. The skill shortage list helps to provide certainty for employers and potential migrants and let potential migrants easily find what skills are in demand in New Zealand. Overall, the skill shortage lists recognize the need for overseas professionals in different areas of the economy and cover regional skill shortages, long term skill shortages, and construction and infrastructure shortages. The Long Term Skill Shortage List basically (LTSSL) identifies occupations where there is a sustained shortage of highly skilled workers throughout New Zealand. Also, employees working in long term skill shortage areas can avail residence permits of 2 years in New Zealand. This list includes Civil engineering technician, electrical engineering technician, procurement management to name a few. The regional skill shortage list (RSSL) identifies the regions with occupations that have an immediate shortage of skilled workers. The regional skill-shortage list mostly includes jobs in agriculture and forestry and finance and business fields as well. Lastly, the Construction and Infrastructure Skill Shortage List (CISSL) contains occupations in critical shortage in the Construction industry across New Zealand. It includes jobs like construction project manager, structural engineer, building associate and many more.

    One of the fundamental issues facing the developed world is their skill shortage as a result of regional mismatch, cyclical shifts, inadequate training levels, and labor market restructuring. Overall, six industries have been identified by the Government of New Zealand for having major gaps in terms of long term skilled employees namely Construction, Engineering, Finance / Business, ICT, Electronics & Telecommunications, Health and Social Services, Recreation, Hospitality, and Tourism.

  • Eligibility criteria for universities in New Zealand
    In New Zealand, the eligibility criteria for international students vary from university to university and course to course. The eligibility requirements for bachelors include a minimum percentage of 60-65% in class 12th. Gap year not more than 1 year and IELTS overall band 6 with no individual band less than 5.5 is acceptable in most of the universities. If the percentage in the 12th is less than 60 % then pathways are recommended. The eligibility requirements for masters include a minimum required percentage which is Subject to Noosr recognition. If students don’t meet the criteria then the pathways would be recommended. Overall band of 6-6.5 and no individual band less than 6.0 for IELTS is generally accepted by most universities in New Zealand.

    Overall the following documents are required for Undergraduate and postgraduate admissions:

    • Academic Records (10th,12th ): Marksheet / school leaving certificate for standards 10th&12th.For masters, transcripts of record and bachelor degree certificate is required for admission.
    • English proficiency test (IELTS, PTE, TOEFL): If the course is taught in English and the student is not a native English speaker, he/she will be required to provide IELTS or TOEFL scores. Overall band of 6-6.5 is required for New Zealand universities.
    • Statement Of Purpose (SOP)-Every SOP should be unique as it portrays the picture of a student’s thought process as a person to the admission committee.
    • Motivation letter: Some universities seek a motivation letter from the student With a motivation letter, universities expect the student to focus more on how the program to which they are applying relates to the students’ background and future goals.Copy of passport/Birth certificate
    • Academic CV
    • Financial documents (Proof of funds): Proof of funds to support the tuition fees and living expenses in New Zealand
    • Letter of Recommendation(1-2): Most of the universities ask for 2-3 LORs for the admission process.LORs are an assessment of the student’s skill set and knowledge as certified by the teacher or immediate supervisor. Some universities also have a designated format of LORs which they sent directly to the referees via email. In such cases, the referees can submit the LOR’s directly via the link sent to them.
    • Work experience details: For management programs like MBA, work experience plays a critical role and thereby at least 2-3 years of work experience is mandatory for pursuing MBA.
    • A valid Health insurance
    • The application Management process for New Zealand
      New Zealand Universities have major intake in February and July and a minor intake in May, June, September, October, and November.

      The applications are done either Online through university and TC Global, or through Pen and Paper submissions.

      You can reach out to our Relationships team for more information.

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